Waterway routes – Canal Voyagers http://canalvoyagers.com/ Wed, 11 May 2022 01:13:27 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://canalvoyagers.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-6-83x150.png Waterway routes – Canal Voyagers http://canalvoyagers.com/ 32 32 10 great motorcycle routes to discover in New York https://canalvoyagers.com/10-great-motorcycle-routes-to-discover-in-new-york/ Fri, 06 May 2022 14:00:17 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/10-great-motorcycle-routes-to-discover-in-new-york/ With stunning scenery, historic communities, dozens of attractions, and well-maintained roads, New York offers motorcyclists a ton of great routes to explore. Whether you want to escape the crowds and get into the wilderness or check out some of the small communities and towns in the state, you’ll have no problem finding something that suits […]]]>

With stunning scenery, historic communities, dozens of attractions, and well-maintained roads, New York offers motorcyclists a ton of great routes to explore. Whether you want to escape the crowds and get into the wilderness or check out some of the small communities and towns in the state, you’ll have no problem finding something that suits your case. If you need a starting point, here are ten of New York’s best motorcycle routes to check out.

1. Fort Lee Loop

Covering a distance of approximately 100 miles, the Fort Lee Loop offers an easy three-hour ride on well-maintained roads. You’ll start in New Jersey and travel through various parts of New York and Connecticut before heading back out. Expect peaceful country roads, bucolic landscapes and a wide variety of places to stop for food along the way. Be sure to allow yourself some time to stop and enjoy the view of Greenwood Lake as well.

2. St. Lawrence Seaway

As newyorkupstate.com says, the St. Lawrence Seaway is one of New York’s most popular motorcycling routes, and for very good reason. A good starting point is Massena, where you can then make the easy trip to Cap Vincent. The scenery along the water along the route is breathtaking, especially at the end point where you can stop and admire the Cap Vincent lighthouse. Take time to explore the quaint little towns along the way – the Clayton Antique Boat Museum is worth around an hour on its own.

3. Green Rural Loop

If you have about 5 hours to spare, the Manhattan Green Rural Loop is an amazing choice. Spread over 131 miles, the loop will take you from Manhattan to Saugatuck Reservoir in southeastern Connecticut and back again, passing through breathtaking scenery. It’s back roads the whole way, so expect a peaceful ride and plenty of places to park to enjoy the view or grab some lunch. If you want to ride the breeze with other bikers, follow the advice of 2wheels.haymondlaw.com and stop at Squire’s Redding Roadhouse in CT.

4. The Catskill Preserve

As motorcyclenerd.com says, no one ever regrets a day in the Catskills, and if you can experience it on a motorcycle, great. After starting in the town of Catskill, meander around Route 23 west on Route 29, before returning to Route 23. It’s about 200 miles in total and covers enough charming little towns and world class scenery to warrant a full 5 hours or more.

5. The Hudson River Bridge Tour

If you are a big fan of scenic walks, the visit of the Hudson River Bridge is a must. Stretching 70 miles along the Hudson, the tour will take you over several stunning bridges (including New York’s George Washington Bridge and the incredibly scenic Newburgh-Beacon Toll Bridge), miles of awe-inspiring scenery, and plenty of stops along the way to keep you in food and fuel. The trip takes 2 hours at a trot, but if you have the time, allow a few more hours so you can stop several times and enjoy the sites (Harriman State Park being one of the most essential).

6. From Goshen to New Paltz

This following route begins in the town of Goshen, passes along Albany Post Road and ends in New Paltz. It only covers 30 miles in total, but considering the scenery along the way, it’s well worth devoting a full afternoon to. Before hitting the road in Goshen, take some time to explore some of the scenic local sites like the Harness Racing Museum and the Hall of Fame. Once you’ve departed, keep your eyes peeled for the scenic nature preserves and farms you’ll pass on the way to New Paltz before enjoying lunch and strolling through the city’s historic downtown area.

7. Storm King Highway Loop

The roller coaster ride along the winding and winding Storm King Road makes for an incredibly thrilling ride, especially when you factor in the stunning views of the surrounding landscape. There are a few stops along the way to stop and enjoy the scenery. If you have free time, park for about an hour and hike around the mountain. The loop covers approximately 45 miles, with an estimated travel time of approximately 2-3 hours.

8. Mohawk Valley/Capital District

This easy and pretty 30-mile route takes about an hour if you go hard, but can easily eat up the best part of an afternoon if you make the most of the stops. Along the way, you’ll pass through some of upstate New York’s prettiest and most scenic historic towns, including Schenectady, Cohoes, Rexford, and Waterford, as well as the beautiful scenery of the Mohawk River and Erie Canal. The main must-see attraction is Cohoes Falls, which ranks among the largest falls east of the Rocky Mountains. They are quite spectacular in the summer, but if you visit them after heavy rains, prepare to be amazed.

9. Harriman Loop

Covering a distance of 32 miles, the Harriman Loop passes through some of the most breathtaking scenery in Harriman State Park. Expect snow-capped mountains, sparkling lakes and acres of verdant woodland. Stops to refuel or refuel are rare, but provided you’re prepared, this is a route you won’t soon forget.

10. Adirondacks

If you want to escape the crowds and enjoy some of upstate New York’s most glorious wilderness, the remote ride through the Adirondacks should be high on your bucket list. The best place to rejoin the road is at Boonville, where you can then start meandering along the 125 miles to the Olympic Village in Lake Placid. As you progress along the route, you’ll pass through historic communities like Old Forge, Inlet, and Long Lake, scenic lakes, densely forested landscapes, and soaring mountains. Wherever you stop, be sure to visit the legendary Hoss’s Country Store in Long Lake.

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The World’s Toughest Cruise Routes https://canalvoyagers.com/the-worlds-toughest-cruise-routes/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 21:09:00 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/the-worlds-toughest-cruise-routes/ Francesca Street, CNN (CNN) – Navigating a colossal ship is no easy feat in all conditions, but some routes, like the narrow Suez Canal, prone to sandstorms – infamously blocked by a container ship year-round latter – or the windy, glacier-lined waterways of Alaska, are particularly challenging. Andy Winbow, a master sailor who has captained […]]]>

Francesca Street, CNN

(CNN) – Navigating a colossal ship is no easy feat in all conditions, but some routes, like the narrow Suez Canal, prone to sandstorms – infamously blocked by a container ship year-round latter – or the windy, glacier-lined waterways of Alaska, are particularly challenging.

Andy Winbow, a master sailor who has captained ships around the world, told CNN Travel that the trickiest routes are often characterized by “adverse weather conditions, a lack of leeway due to natural hazards and a lack of aids to navigation”.

These factors will impact any ship, but multi-deck cruise ships may be more affected due to their volume.

“The higher the ship, the greater the drift”, so says David Pembridge. Pembridge is a retired cruise ship captain who worked for decades on ships operated by P&O Cruises and Princess Cruises.

When tall ships are buffeted by the wind, they are susceptible to slipping – a term used to describe a ship that is blown sideways. To counteract this effect, the ship must be steered at a certain angle.

This maneuver is very tricky when crossing a waterway like the Suez Canal or the Panama Canal. In these narrow channels, vessels must also avoid hitting the channel walls.

“If they pass at high speed, it causes the banks to erode and carries some of the sand to the sides and towards the center of the channel, which is not good because it makes it shallower, so it causes subsidence” , explains Pembridge.

While the Suez Canal and the Panama Canal have unifying characteristics, there are also key differences between the Egyptian Waterway and the South American Canal.

Where the Panama Canal is largely lined with forest and vegetation, the Suez is flanked by flat desert, meaning there is a risk of poor visibility from sandstorms.

And while the 120-mile Suez is largely straight, the roughly 50-mile Panama Canal “meanders in and out of the islands,” as Pembridge puts it, that topography adding another dimension to the challenge.

“It’s a different kind of difficulty, but it still requires quite intense concentration,” says Pembridge.

Ships passing through the Panama Canal must also pass through three different sets of locks. In recent years the locks have been widened to better accommodate larger ships, but when Pembridge regularly sailed the route his ship was only separated from the sides of the lock by a few feet.

In Panama, mechanical locomotives also help tow cruise ships through locks, while in particularly narrow sections of the Suez, tugs help guide larger vessels.

“It’s normally a long day for the crew on board, because you start and you don’t stop until you’ve crossed the other end,” says Pembridge of going through the two channels.

The role of the pilot

All ships operating in the Suez and Panama are assisted by local sailors.

These sailors, known as marine pilots, board the ship at the start of the channel and work with the crew on board to ensure safe passage.

Both the Suez Canal and the Panama Canal are “compulsory pilotage areas” – meaning pilots are not optional, they are required by law.

Pembridge suggests the working relationship between pilots and captains isn’t always smooth.

“That’s one of the helps, and one of the hindrances, sometimes, depending on the skill level and the personalities involved,” he says.

“The pilot must legally direct the cause and the speed of the ship. But at the same time, the captain of the ship still has the responsibility for the safe navigation of the ship and this cannot be abrogated to the pilot.”

In some regions, the pilot’s role is less crucial and not necessarily a legal requirement. But in more difficult ports and waterways – like Suez and Panama, or the waterways around Alaska – their role is essential.

Captain John Herring was a captain of a research vessel before becoming a naval pilot in Southeast Alaska.

Herring tells CNN Travel that there are two main reasons pilots need to be on ships in certain areas.

“First, we provide local knowledge about road hazards, tides and currents, weather, concentrations of marine life, etc.,” he explains.

“Second, being independent of the vessel, we bring objective decision-making that is not subject to the economic pressures of the vessel’s schedule. The captains are experts in their own vessels and we are experts in Alaskan waters.”

Southeast Alaska is a compulsory riding area, partly because it is subject to strong winds and currents, and partly because of its marine ecosystem.

“Alaska’s coastal waters are blessed with an abundance of marine mammals,” says Herring. “Whale watching is a favorite pastime for passengers, but it requires constant vigilance on deck to avoid close encounters.”

Likewise, sightings of icebergs and glaciers can be the highlight of an Alaskan cruise, but these icy formations can cause difficulties for ships.

“This ice is hard and can damage the hull or the propellers,” says Herring, adding that strong winds and currents make navigating icy waters even more difficult.

In recent years, technology has evolved, making it somewhat easier to navigate unpredictable routes for ships.

But Herring suggests pilots are still an integral part of the age of satellite technology.

“The local pilot can still bring the ship to port safely without GPS,” he says.

Water depth and local topography

Ships sailing around Alaska also have to deal with varying water depths. In shallow channels, ships must move slowly to avoid creating an area of ​​low pressure under the ship that could ground the ship on the seabed.

“Vessels can squat if they sail too fast and therefore don’t have enough space under the keel,” says master seaman Andy Winbow.

Cruising itineraries around the Norwegian Fjords and the Chilean Fjords and Canals also involve occasionally navigating in shallow water.

Other cruise ship routes present problems because their topography is constantly changing.

Pembridge gives the example of the Amazon River, sections of which are sometimes crossed on South American cruises.

“The bottom of the Amazon is continuously moving and so on a nautical chart it will show an island, and when you get there the island will not be there, it will have moved somewhere else,” he explains. “It depends a lot on the pilots then – the local pilots are people who know the river and know how it moves.”

Urban ports can also pose problems.

Pembridge points to the Dutch ports of Amsterdam and Rotterdam and the German port of Hamburg, as well as Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam.

To dock in one of these cities, cruise ships must first navigate through a narrow channel, and how easily this is largely dependent on weather conditions.

Planning and unexpected moments

A solid travel plan is essential for smooth sailing. Pembridge explains that cruise ship passage plans are usually designed by a junior officer and then approved by the captain. Plans will always consider all known potential challenges, such as wind, waterway width, tides and surrounding terrain.

“If you’re on the high seas, it’s a relatively simple briefing – this is the course we intend to take, this is the speed we intend to go. Once you get close of the earth, and it gets more complicated, then you start highlighting the hazards, the currents, and the likely weather effects of everything,” says Pembridge.

“And then when you get into really confined waters – that’s what the [Suez and Panama] the channels are — so it’s a much more intense briefing.”

The threat of piracy is another factor taken into consideration, although Pembridge suggests this is less of an issue than it once was.

He remembers leading ships speeding through the Gulf of Arden, turning off lights at night and conducting passenger drills.

The weather is also taken into account when planning the trip, but not all the preparation in the world can fully account for the unexpected.

Pembridge remembers a time when he was captain of a ship sailing from the Falkland Islands to South America. The wind must have been strong, but when night fell the strong gusts were much stronger than expected.

Throughout the night, Pembridge and his team slowly leaned into the waves in an attempt to counter the impact of the wind. When day broke, they saw the extent of what they were dealing with.

“It was really, really big waves. And the bow of the ship was going down there and up, it was perfectly safe, but very uncomfortable.”

By the time the weather had cleared, the ship had veered off course about 30 miles. The ports had to be refitted and the voyage rescheduled.

But Pembridge points out that while ships may encounter unexpected challenges, ships and those in charge are generally prepared for the obstacles.

“Modern cruise ships are well equipped to handle virtually any challenge that comes their way,” says Pembridge.

The-CNN-Wire
™ & © 2022 Cable News Network, Inc., a WarnerMedia company. All rights reserved.

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10 great European roads for everyone https://canalvoyagers.com/10-great-european-roads-for-everyone-2/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 06:56:00 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/10-great-european-roads-for-everyone-2/ Walking, how can I love you? Let me count the paths. There is the sense of freedom, fresh air and forward motion; the big views and the little surprises; how good a chilled pinot grigio after the walk is. And none of these things – none of them – require you to walk until you’re […]]]>

Walking, how can I love you? Let me count the paths. There is the sense of freedom, fresh air and forward motion; the big views and the little surprises; how good a chilled pinot grigio after the walk is. And none of these things – none of them – require you to walk until you’re broke every day.

Soft hiking is still hiking. By traversing shorter, easier routes at a gentle pace, you’ll still reap the slowly unfolding, richly inhaled, otherwise unreachable benefits that only exploration on foot can provide. In fact, you can be said to reap them more fully than the hardcore hiker who clocks in the miles without having time to stop and look. It is an exquisite pleasure to sleep in late, to linger over a hearty breakfast, to go on a gentle hike, to cross superb landscapes, to stop where and when you want, knowing that a comfortable inn and a good glass of wine await you.

No, you don’t have to struggle to get the most out of a hike. As long as you know the basics. And the first thing is to decide what you actually like. If you’re going to spend a lot of time exploring an area, make it an area that really appeals. You have decided to take a walk, yes, but what gives you even more joy? Sea air and wild swimming? Forests full of birds? Pottery in cobblestone villages? Drive through an intoxicating wine region (with many open cellar doors)? Be sure to walk where you’re interested, so walking isn’t the only reward.

Plus, the hike doesn’t have to leave you with sore limbs. The range and diversity of trails – especially across Europe – is immense. So look for suitable routes: short paths, soft surfaces, rest days and trains, boats and funiculars that can help relieve the strain.

Luggage? You don’t want to worry about it. If you opt for a walk from hotel to hotel, choose the one where your big bags are in advance, which allows you to travel light, just a backpack with the essentials: waterproof, water bottle, picnic greedy fuck.

Yes, gourmet – why not? Because it’s your vacation after all and there’s no need to struggle. There are trips out there that combine the best of everything, during which you can spend days strolling in historic splendor, munching on fine local dishes, and ending up in ancient palaces or five-star spa hotels. stars with a Michelin star feast. Walk soft, I really love you.

Best Hiking Holidays for Softies

Walk smoothly on the floor of the house

Suffolk, United Kingdom

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The World’s Toughest Cruise Routes https://canalvoyagers.com/the-worlds-toughest-cruise-routes-2/ Fri, 29 Apr 2022 01:43:52 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/the-worlds-toughest-cruise-routes-2/ Editor’s note – Monthly ticket is a new CNN Travel series that sheds light on some of the most fascinating topics in the world of travel. In April, we set sail for the diverse world of cruises. Whether you’re looking for travel inspiration or insider knowledge, Monthly Ticket will get you there. (CNN) — Navigating […]]]>

Editor’s note – Monthly ticket is a new CNN Travel series that sheds light on some of the most fascinating topics in the world of travel. In April, we set sail for the diverse world of cruises. Whether you’re looking for travel inspiration or insider knowledge, Monthly Ticket will get you there.

(CNN) — Navigating a colossal ship is no small feat in any conditions, but certain routes, such as the narrow, sandstorm-prone Suez Canal – notoriously blocked by a container ship last year – or the Alaska’s windy, glacier-lined waterways are particularly challenging. difficult.
Andy Winbow, a master sailor who has captained ships around the world, told CNN Travel that the trickiest itineraries are often characterized by “adverse weather conditions, a lack of leeway due to natural hazards and a lack of aids to navigation”.

These factors will impact any ship, but multi-deck cruise ships may be more affected due to their volume.

“The higher the ship, the greater the drift”, so says David Pembridge. Pembridge is a retired cruise ship captain who worked for decades on ships operated by P&O Cruises and Princess Cruises.

When tall ships are buffeted by the wind, they are susceptible to slipping – a term used to describe a ship that is blown sideways. To counteract this effect, the ship must be steered at a certain angle.

This maneuver is very tricky when crossing a waterway like the Suez Canal or the Panama Canal. In these narrow channels, vessels must also avoid hitting the channel walls.

“If they cross at high speed it causes the banks to erode and carries some of the sand from the sides and towards the center of the channel, which is not good because it makes it shallower, so it causes digging” , says Pembridge.

A cruise ship sails through the Panama Canal on April 23, 2022.

LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/AFP via Getty Images

While the Suez Canal and the Panama Canal have unifying characteristics, there are also key differences between the Egyptian Waterway and the South American Canal.

Where the Panama Canal is largely lined with forest and vegetation, the Suez is flanked by flat desert, meaning there is a risk of poor visibility from sandstorms.

And while the 120-mile Suez is largely straight, the roughly 50-mile Panama Canal “meanders in and out of the islands,” as Pembridge puts it, with that topography adding another dimension to the challenge.

“It’s a different kind of difficulty, but it still requires quite intense concentration,” says Pembridge.

Ships passing through the Panama Canal must also pass through three different sets of locks. In recent years the locks have been widened to better accommodate larger ships, but when Pembridge regularly sailed the route his ship was only separated from the sides of the lock by a few feet.

In Panama, mechanical locomotives also help tow cruise ships through locks, while in particularly narrow sections of the Suez, tugs help guide larger vessels.

“It’s normally a long day for the crew on board, because you start and you don’t stop until you’ve crossed the other end,” says Pembridge of going through the two channels.

The role of the pilot

Cruise ships are helped down the Suez Canal by expert local sailors, called marine pilots.

Cruise ships are helped down the Suez Canal by expert local sailors, called marine pilots.

Soeren Stache/picture-alliance/dpa/AP

All ships operating in the Suez and Panama are assisted by local sailors.

These sailors, known as marine pilots, board the ship at the start of the channel and work with the crew on board to ensure safe passage.

Both the Suez Canal and the Panama Canal are “compulsory pilotage areas” – meaning pilots are not optional, they are required by law.

Pembridge suggests the working relationship between pilots and captains isn’t always smooth.

“That’s one of the helps, and one of the hindrances, sometimes, depending on the skill level and the personalities involved,” he says.

“The pilot must legally direct the cause and the speed of the ship. But at the same time, the captain of the ship still has the responsibility for the safe navigation of the ship and this cannot be abrogated to the pilot.”

In some regions, the pilot’s role is less crucial and not necessarily a legal requirement. But in more difficult ports and waterways – like Suez and Panama, or the waterways around Alaska – their role is essential.

Captain John Herring was a captain of a research vessel before becoming a naval pilot in Southeast Alaska.

Herring tells CNN Travel that there are two main reasons pilots need to be on ships in certain areas.

“First, we provide local knowledge about road hazards, tides and currents, weather, concentrations of marine life, etc.,” he explains.

“Second, being independent of the vessel, we bring objective decision-making that is not subject to the economic pressures of the vessel’s schedule. Captains are experts in their own vessels and we are experts in Alaskan waters.”

Southeast Alaska is a compulsory riding area, partly because it is subject to strong winds and currents, and partly because of its marine ecosystem.

“Alaska’s coastal waters are blessed with an abundance of marine mammals,” says Herring. “Whale watching is a favorite pastime for passengers, but it requires constant vigilance on deck to avoid close encounters.”

Likewise, sightings of icebergs and glaciers can be the highlight of an Alaskan cruise, but these icy formations can cause difficulties for ships.

“This ice is hard and can damage the hull or the propellers,” says Herring, adding that strong winds and currents make navigating icy waters even more difficult.

In recent years, technology has evolved, making it somewhat easier to navigate unpredictable routes for ships.

But Herring suggests pilots are still an integral part of the age of satellite technology.

“The local pilot can still bring the ship to port safely without GPS,” he says.

Water depth and local topography

Chile's fjords and canals, including the Murray Channel in southern Chile, shown here, can pose special challenges for ships.

Chile’s fjords and canals, including the Murray Channel in southern Chile, shown here, can pose special challenges for ships.

Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket/Getty Images

Ships sailing around Alaska also have to deal with varying water depths. In shallow channels, ships must move slowly to avoid creating an area of ​​low pressure under the ship that could ground the ship on the seabed.

“Vessels can squat if they sail too fast and therefore don’t have enough space under the keel,” says master seaman Andy Winbow.

Cruising itineraries around the Norwegian Fjords and the Chilean Fjords and Canals also involve occasionally navigating in shallow water.

Other cruise ship routes present problems because their topography is constantly changing.

Pembridge gives the example of the Amazon River, sections of which are sometimes crossed on South American cruises.

“The bottom of the Amazon is continuously moving and so on a nautical chart it will show an island, and when you get there the island will not be there, it will have moved somewhere else,” he explains. “It depends a lot on the pilots then – the local pilots are people who know the river and know how it moves.”

Urban ports can also pose problems.

Pembridge points to the Dutch ports of Amsterdam and Rotterdam and the German port of Hamburg, as well as Ho Chi Minh City in Vietnam.

To dock in one of these cities, cruise ships must first navigate through a narrow channel, and how easily this is largely dependent on weather conditions.

Planning and unexpected moments

Pembridge took this photo of one of the locks in the Panama Canal while at the helm of the P&O Cruises cruise ship MV Aurora.

Pembridge took this photo of one of the locks in the Panama Canal while at the helm of the P&O Cruises cruise ship MV Aurora.

David Pembbridge

A solid travel plan is essential for smooth sailing. Pembridge explains that cruise ship passage plans are usually designed by a junior officer and then approved by the captain. Plans will always consider all known potential challenges, such as wind, waterway width, tides and surrounding terrain.

“If you’re on the high seas, it’s a relatively simple briefing – this is the course we intend to take, this is the speed we intend to go. Once you get close of the earth, and it gets more complicated, then you start highlighting the hazards, the currents, and the likely weather effects of everything,” says Pembridge.

“And then when you get into really confined waters – that’s what the [Suez and Panama] the channels are — so it’s a much more intense briefing.”

The threat of piracy is another factor taken into consideration, although Pembridge suggests this is less of an issue than it once was.

He remembers leading ships speeding through the Gulf of Arden, turning off lights at night and conducting passenger drills.

Captain David Pembridge, who retired in 2020, pictured near Cape Horn in Chile.

Captain David Pembridge, who retired in 2020, pictured near Cape Horn in Chile.

David Pembbridge

The weather is also taken into account when planning the trip, but not all the preparation in the world can fully account for the unexpected.

Pembridge remembers a time when he was captain of a ship sailing from the Falkland Islands to South America. The wind must have been strong, but when night fell the strong gusts were much stronger than expected.

Throughout the night, Pembridge and his team slowly leaned into the waves in an attempt to counter the impact of the wind. When day broke, they saw the extent of what they were dealing with.

“It was really, really big waves. And the bow of the ship was going down there and up, it was perfectly safe, but very uncomfortable.”

By the time the weather had cleared, the ship had veered off course about 30 miles. The ports had to be refitted and the voyage rescheduled.

But Pembridge points out that while ships may encounter unexpected challenges, ships and those in charge are generally prepared for the obstacles.

“Modern cruise ships are well equipped to handle virtually any challenge that comes their way,” says Pembridge.

Top photo: A cruise ship sails past the Margerie Glacier in Glacier Bay, Alaska. Photo credit: Tim Rue/Bloomberg via Getty Images

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Climate change could change the face of trade routes through the GCC https://canalvoyagers.com/climate-change-could-change-the-face-of-trade-routes-through-the-gcc/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 21:21:15 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/climate-change-could-change-the-face-of-trade-routes-through-the-gcc/ Climate change could change the face of trade routes through the GCC Temperatures could rise by 3°C or more by 2090. (SPA) There are many scenarios for how climate change could affect the world. However, it is becoming clear that unless there are significant changes in climate policies, the world could continue to warm. Sea […]]]>

Climate change could change the face of trade routes through the GCC

Temperatures could rise by 3°C or more by 2090. (SPA)

There are many scenarios for how climate change could affect the world. However, it is becoming clear that unless there are significant changes in climate policies, the world could continue to warm.

Sea levels could continue to rise. Weather conditions could change in many areas. The jet stream and other major wind currents may change. Tidal patterns and other oceans could change. Given the dismal failures of global climate meetings and the climate initiatives of many countries, temperatures could actually rise by 3°C or more by 2090.

The war in Ukraine, sanctions against Russia, and other energy and inflationary shocks have set back climate change policies. The great race to close the gaps in oil and gas supply eclipses the race to contain climate change. Energy security has taken precedence over environmental and climate security as the main objective for many governments around the world. It may take a long time for climate issues to gain prominence in political discussions.

Predicting climate and environmental changes is more complicated than predicting the weather. And climate and environmental changes are making weather forecasts more uncertain over longer periods of time. However, those responsible for choke points, such as ports as well as sea and sea lanes in the region must plan anyway.

Another set of changes to consider include planned energy transitions. Many countries in the region already have plans to develop these energy movements. Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates stand out for their green initiatives.

As climate change moves towards its currently seemingly inevitable trajectory towards 3C+, arctic routes will become more economical as the ice melts.

Dr. Paul Sullivan

One would expect the importance of oil and gas in the world to decline. Peak oil and peak gas will be caused more by peak demand than by peak supply. There will be a shift towards electric vehicles and even electric ships and planes. Ships could turn more to liquefied natural gas, hydrogen or other fuels and move away from the usual heavy oils used in recent years. They and other forms of transportation could turn into fuels and energy sources that we don’t even know anything about yet. There could be a significant revolution in shipping technologies occurring as energy transitions, climate changes, and other movements occur.

There will likely be more trade and shipping of minerals, metals, equipment and technologies for renewables, nuclear and other forms of green energy – and less trade and shipping of petroleum , gas and coal. Ships and shipping must change with this. Shipping routes must change. Ports will need to plan different types of storage, berthing, offloading and local and regional transport links for these new materials.
This will surely increase the demand for logistics and supply chain change experts, for those who are thinking about job opportunities in all of this.

Shipping routes could also change. As climate change moves towards its currently seemingly inevitable trajectory towards 3C+, arctic routes will become more economical as the ice melts. However, safety, security, navigation and other infrastructure must be built along the Arctic. Long stretches of these roads completely lack this infrastructure. For these itineraries to be feasible, significant background work is necessary.

If Suez is challenged by new Arctic routes, the Bab El Mandab Strait along the Arabian Peninsula will also be challenged, as will ports along the Red Sea. Hormuz could be challenged by the relative decline in trade along the Suez Canal and an expected decline in oil and LNG trade over the coming decades. Ports all along the southern and eastern parts of the Arabian Peninsula may encounter many new competitive challenges. It is possible that oil and gas will be replaced by hydrogen and ammonia of all colors, but that would also be determined by how competition develops between the region and other parts of the world.

One thing is certain, change is on the way. And the states of the Gulf Cooperation Council must be prepared.

• Dr. Paul Sullivan is Senior Associate Researcher at KFCRIS and Nonresident Researcher at the Global Energy Center, Atlantic Council.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed by the authors in this section are their own and do not necessarily reflect the views of Arab News

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Fuel prices, routes and uncomfortable decisions (Part 1) https://canalvoyagers.com/fuel-prices-routes-and-uncomfortable-decisions-part-1/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/fuel-prices-routes-and-uncomfortable-decisions-part-1/ CHICAGO — A new challenge was the last thing dry cleaners wanted to deal with as the industry continues to recover from the damage wrought by the pandemic. When Russia invaded Ukraine in February, however, the ripple effects were quickly felt around the world. Beyond the humanitarian catastrophe this action created in Ukraine, the global […]]]>

CHICAGO — A new challenge was the last thing dry cleaners wanted to deal with as the industry continues to recover from the damage wrought by the pandemic.

When Russia invaded Ukraine in February, however, the ripple effects were quickly felt around the world. Beyond the humanitarian catastrophe this action created in Ukraine, the global economy quickly faced a crisis as international sanctions against Russia reduced the amount of oil available on the international market, leading to a dramatic rise gasoline prices.

Dry cleaners, already facing supply chain issues, labor shortages and shifting market demand, quickly found their expenses rising again. This was especially true for those operating on major roads.

So why have gasoline prices risen so dramatically and what should cleaners do to offset another spike in spending?

The global market

“We have this obvious impact from the fact that the world’s third-largest oil producer is essentially shut out of the market,” says Dr. Chris Kuehl, economist and managing director of Armada Corporate Intelligence. “Seventy percent of Russian oil has no market right now because there is no place to sell it.”

Yet, at first glance, it may be difficult to understand why prices in the United States were hit so quickly.

“When you look at the total amount of oil we would get from Russia, it was on average, per year, less than 2%,” Kuehl says. “We never did much business with Russia because it was just easier to do business with closer countries. To buy in Russia, you would have to put it in a tanker and then cross the Black Sea to get to the Mediterranean. Why would we go through all this? We just bought it from the Middle East, and they ship it to the Horn of Africa or through the Suez Canal, and we were good to go.

However, Kuehl thinks the impact on the United States becomes apparent when we look beyond American borders. Because many European countries are major importers of Russian oil, foregoing that supply has put more pressure on global markets as they look elsewhere to meet their needs.

“That’s what struck us right away,” says Kuehl. “Oil is a global commodity.”

So why aren’t other oil producers, foreign and domestic, increasing their production to make up for the shortfall? Kuehl thinks it’s because they’re taking a long-term view of the situation.

“The subtlest thing that is holding back the recovery is that the oil industry sees this current crisis as something temporary, or at least something that could be,” he says. “They believe, however unlikely, that there is a quick end to this conflict – negotiations are starting, there is a ceasefire, there is some kind of withdrawal – the world will react pretty quickly and say, ‘OK, Russia is responding, so let’s lower some of these sanctions and get some of this oil that we need. The oil industry expects people not to want to sacrifice themselves if they have an excuse to go back to their old ways.

Although the pandemic has receded, its impact on the American workforce is still being felt, and it is also a factor driving up gasoline prices.

“(Oil producers) are looking at the one thing that’s really driving demand for them, and that’s commuting,” Kuehl says. “They know that about 92% of our fuel consumption comes and goes from work. So while 60% of us are still working remotely, commuting isn’t back. They say, ‘Yes, we see this short-term demand, but the long-term demand is not there yet.’

Kuehl thinks producers simply don’t see any economic advantage in bringing more oil to market: “They’re not going to spend the money to drastically increase production, because it’s going to be seven or eight months anyway before that these efforts go online, only to find that this immediate crisis is over and we are still working remotely.

Check back Tuesday for Part 2 of this series, where we’ll look at the choices dry cleaners have to protect their bottom line.

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More container ships are deployed on routes from Asia to the US East Coast https://canalvoyagers.com/more-container-ships-are-deployed-on-routes-from-asia-to-the-us-east-coast/ Thu, 21 Apr 2022 23:41:00 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/more-container-ships-are-deployed-on-routes-from-asia-to-the-us-east-coast/ US East Coast ports are seeing the strongest growth in container volumes from Asia (Charleston file photo) Posted on April 21, 2022 at 7:41 p.m. by The Maritime Executive Changes in consumer consumption habits and increasing Asian imports into the United States continue to reshape […]]]>

US East Coast ports are seeing the strongest growth in container volumes from Asia (Charleston file photo)

Posted on April 21, 2022 at 7:41 p.m. by

The Maritime Executive







Changes in consumer consumption habits and increasing Asian imports into the United States continue to reshape the container shipping industry. New data from logistics and supply chain analytics firm Alphaliner highlights shifting trends in Asian trade that are impacting industry and operations at major U.S. ports.


The record order book for new container ships will significantly boost the industry’s future capacity and operations. However, so far much of the focus has been on Asia-Europe routes where the first 24,000 TEU ultra-large container ships have been deployed and are reshaping port operations and deployments. However, the industry is not expecting new ships to change wider deployment patterns.


Alphaliner highlights the dramatic growth of transpacific routes. They report that over the past year, container capacity on routes between Asia and North America has increased by a quarter (24%), with most major carriers deploying additional capacity to grab a piece of the lucrative market. Many carriers highlighted the use of additional shippers beyond their normal hours as well as the introduction of new routes and services to capture market share.





At the beginning of April 2022, Alphaliner calculates that there are a total of 702 container ships deployed between Asia and North America. In total, they report that capacity on Asia-North America routes has reached 5.75 million TEUs.


While reports of sizable ship backlogs lining up at Pacific Coast ports suggest much of the new capacity has been rolled out to U.S. West Coast routes, Alphaliner data underscores that the east coast of the United States has been the biggest beneficiary of growth and that it will continue to grow with the introduction of additional new services.


“The total capacity of all vessels deployed on the Asia-US East Coast services increased 28.1% year-on-year, compared to 20.5% growth for the fleet trading between Asia and the United States. the west coast of North America,” reports Alphaliner. They cite capacity increases from major carriers, including Maersk, MSC, CMA CGM, COSCO, Evergreen and Zim, as driving volume growth to East Coast ports.


This dramatic growth may well explain the large backlogs that developed in 2021 and 2022 off US East Coast ports. Marine Traffic analysts, for example, recently pointed out that as of early April 2022, there were more container capacity awaiting docks at US East Coast ports than in the notoriously lagging west coast ports.


The imbalance between East and West is only likely to increase in the months to come. Many analysts have predicted major carriers and shippers will divert shipments to East Coast and Gulf Coast ports to avoid potential disruption as contract negotiations for West Coast stevedores begin in May ahead of expiration. of the summer contract.


Carriers continue to respond to changing shipper habits, with Alphaliner highlighting the May introduction of a new Ocean Alliance-operated route between China and South Korea via the Panama Canal to ports in the east coast of Norfolk, Savannah, Charleston, Miami. They report that COSCO, OOCL, CMA CGM and Evergreen will deploy ten vessels with a capacity of between 10,000 and 14,000 TEUs on the route.


Market strength from Asia to North America has also drawn smaller carriers into the market, resulting in a surprising Alphaliner discovery that goes against many arguments. “The joint market share of the big three alliances has fallen from 82.2% to 67.7%,” Alphaliner reports, unlike the Biden administration which has blamed the alliances for many current market issues.


In the short term, with no sign of faltering import demand, these trends should continue to develop. US East Coast ports have all rushed to make critical infrastructure investments to increase their capacity and ability to handle the larger generations of ultra-large container ships expected to be deployed in ports in the years to come.





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Getting around the city’s waterways https://canalvoyagers.com/getting-around-the-citys-waterways-2/ Mon, 18 Apr 2022 15:32:32 +0000 https://canalvoyagers.com/getting-around-the-citys-waterways-2/ Shihab Sarkar | Published: April 18, 2022 9:32:32 p.m. The new look of the famous Hatirjheel Lake in Dhaka is spectacular. Over the past few years, he continues to change his overall appearance relentlessly. The efforts of the authorities to transform the lake from a foul-smelling body of water into a tempting place to pass […]]]>